Specialist in Dental Sleep Medicine: Oral Appliance Therapy

Dr. Shapira Always tired cause by lack of sleep, Blog, Breathing problems can cause TMJ, Breathing Sleeping Problems, Orthodontic Treatment of Sleep Disorders, Sleep, Sleep Apnea, Sleep Apnea and Sleep Disorders, Sleep Apnea Effects & Symptoms, Sleep Apnea Specialist, Sleep Apnea Treatment, Sleep Disorder, Sleep Disorder Causes, Sleep Disorder Diagnosis, Sleep Disorder Treatment, Sleep Problems, Sleep Weight Gain and Loss, Snoring, Snoring Devices, Treating Sleep Disorders, weight and sleep problems, Why do I snore 0 Comments

THERE IS NO SPECIALTY IN DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE OR IN SUPPLYING ORAL APPLIANCE THERAPY FOR TREATING SLEEP APNEA.  THERE ARE DENTISTS WHO OFFER COMFORTABLE ALTERNATIVES TO CPAP AND SOME OF THOSE DENTISTS HAVE ADVANCED TRAINING.

Dentists who treat Sleep Apnea have taken a major step out of the mechanical world of dentistry and into the fields of physiology and medicine. A very select group of dentists go further and achieve Diplomate Status in the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine.  Attaining Diplomat status is not the same as achieving specialty a specialty licencse.  There are no specialties in Dental Sleep Medicine.

I am proud to be the only dentist in the State of Illinois who not only achieved Diplomate Status but was actually one of the original twenty founding members of the SLEEP DISORDER DENTAL SOCIETY  now the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM). I have taught courses to hundreds of dentists  and taught intensive courses to small groups of doctors and their teams many who have successfully limited their practice to Dental Sleep Medicine or better still Dental Sleep Medicine and treatment of TMJ disorders.

In 2001 the NHLBI of the NIH published a report “The Cardiovascular and Sleep Related Consequences of Temporomandibular Disorders” This was a natural continuation of the research I had done as a n Assistant Professor at Rush Medical Schools Sleep Disorder Service working under Dr Rosalind Cartwright, the Mother of Dental Sleep Medicine.

I wrote a Guest Editorial in The Journal of CranioMandibular Practice (CRANIO)

“The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute considers the Cardiac and Sleep Consequences of Temporomandibular Disorders ”

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Recommended in their parameters of care that dentists treating sleep apnea with oral appliances be knowledgable in the field of Temporomandibular Disorders and Management of the TMJoint. As the current Chair of the Alliance of TMD Organizations I believe this knowledge is essential for all dentist treating sleep apnea.

I currently lecture on the common Developmental Aspects of Sleep Apnea, TMJ Disorders, Headaches, Migraines, Chronic Daily Headaches, ADD, ADHD and other behavioral disorders.

There is long history to the AADSM. I was one of 20 dentists in 1991 who was a Founding and Charter member of the Sleep Disorder Dental Society. This was an elite group who not only treated patients but were interested in creating the field of Dental Sleep Medicine. These early members studied and researched this infant field. The pride is similar to the pride I feel as a parent and as a grandparent. I had been a Visiting Assistant Professor at Rush Medical School doing research on jaw position in Sleep Apnea Patients since 1985 and had been treating sleep apnea and snoring since 1982.

I was one of fewer than 100 dentists who were credentialed by the Sleep Disorder Dental Society prior to it becoming the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine. There were only 25 of us at the inaugural meeting in 1992. I was the only one with an appointment medical school appointment to faculty level position.

The American Dental Association approved SDDS educational programs for continuing education credit in 1996.

Springer published the first volume of Sleep and Breathing in 1997 which is the official peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the AADSM.

SDDS founds the Certification Program which credentialed approximately  100 dentists between 1998 and 2004. I was credentialed by the SDDS under this program. In 1998 Dr Rosalind Cartwright recruited me to return to Rush Medical School Sleep Service as an Assistant Professor to treat patients at Rush, be involved in educational programs and make Dental Sleep Medicine an integral part of sleep medicine at Rush Medical School.

Rush Medical Sleep Disorder Service, under Dr Rosalind Cartwright was responsible for much of the earliest research into oral appliance therapy to treat sleep apnea and snoring.  The first articles came out of Rush on the Tongue Retaining Device form Dr Charles Samuelson who I worked closely with at the Medical School.  Dr Cartwright also published the first research on positional treatment of sleep apnea.

The SDDS officially became the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine in 2000 and became part of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine in 2002. In that year membership had grown from 20 doctors in 1991 to over 300 dentists. The following year the AADSM and AASM began to run their annual meetings together.

The American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine (ABDSM) replaces the ADSM’s Certification Program for the administration of board-certification in dental sleep medicine. I was among the first  group of official Diplomates, of The American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine under this program.

In 2006 the world of Dental Sleep Medicine changes drastically after the AASM publishes “Practice Parameters for the Treatment of Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Oral Appliances” in the journal SLEEP.

In 2006, the era of pioneers in Dental Sleep Medicine morphed into the era of active growth of the field of Dental Sleep Medicine. The Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine officially became the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine in 2006. In 2013 the membership of the AADSM surpassed 3000 active members.

In 2013 Cranio Journal officially changed it’s name form the “Journal of Craniomandibular Practice” to the “Journal of CranioMandibular and Sleep Practice” and I was asked due to my history in the fields of Sleep and TMJ by Riley Lunn the editor to write a Guest Editorial celebrating this change.    The editorial “TMJ Alas, The Great Imposter, has a Co-Conspirator: Poor Sleep”

Cranio. 2007 Apr;25(2):77-8.…

Chicago: Diplomate American Board Of Dental Sleep Medicine

Dr. Shapira Blog, Breathing Sleeping Problems, Cluster Headache, CPAP Alternatives, Depression and Sleep Disorder, Lack of Sleep, Memory Loss Lack of Sleep, Orthodontic Treatment of Sleep Disorders, Sleep, Sleep Apnea, Sleep Apnea and Sleep Disorders, Sleep Apnea Effects & Symptoms, Sleep Apnea Specialist, Sleep Apnea Treatment, Sleep Disorder, Sleep Disorder Causes, Sleep Disorder Diagnosis, Sleep Disorder Treatment, Sleep Problems, Sleep Weight Gain and Loss, Snoring, Snoring Devices, TMJ, Uncategorized 0 Comments

ORAL APPLIANCE THERAPY FOR TREATING SLEEP APNEA

COMFORTABLE ALTERNATIVES TO CPAP

Dentists who treat Sleep Apnea have taken a major step out of the mechanical world of dentistry and into the fields of physiology and medicine. A very select group of dentists go further and achieve Diplomate Status in the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine.

I am proud to be the only dentist in the State of Illinois who not only achieved Diplomate Status but was actually one of the original twenty founding members of the SLEEP DISORDER DENTAL SOCIETY  now the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM). I have taught courses to hundreds of dentists  and taught intensive courses to small groups of doctors and their teams many who have successfully limited their practice to Dental Sleep Medicine or better still Dental Sleep Medicine and treatment of TMJ disorders.

In 2001 the NHLBI of the NIH published a report “The Cardiovascular and Sleep Related Consequences of Temporomandibular Disorders” This was a natural continuation of the research I had done as a n Assistant Professor at Rush Medical Schools Sleep Disorder Service working under Dr Rosalind Cartwright, the Mother of Dental Sleep Medicine.

I wrote a Guest Editorial in The Journal of CranioMandibular Practice (CRANIO)

“The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute considers the Cardiac and Sleep Consequences of Temporomandibular Disorders ”

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Recommended in their parameters of care that dentists treating sleep apnea with oral appliances be knowledgable in the field of Temporomandibular Disorders and Management of the TMJoint. As the current Chair of the Alliance of TMD Organizations I believe this knowledge is essential for all dentist treating sleep apnea.

I currently lecture on the common Developmental Aspects of Sleep Apnea, TMJ Disorders, Headaches, Migraines, Chronic Daily Headaches, ADD, ADHD and other behavioral disorders.

There is long history to the AADSM. I was one of 20 dentists in 1991 who was a Founding and Charter member of the Sleep Disorder Dental Society. This was an elite group who not only treated patients but were interested in creating the field of Dental Sleep Medicine. These early members studied and researched this infant field. The pride is similar to the pride I feel as a parent and as a grandparent. I had been a Visiting Assistant Professor at Rush Medical School doing research on jaw position in Sleep Apnea Patients since 1985 and had been treating sleep apnea and snoring since 1982.

I was one of fewer than 100 dentists who were credentialed by the Sleep Disorder Dental Society prior to it becoming the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine. There were only 25 of us at the inaugural meeting in 1992. I was the only one with an appointment medical school appointment to faculty level position.

The American Dental Association approved SDDS educational programs for continuing education credit in 1996.

Springer published the first volume of Sleep and Breathing in 1997 which is the official peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the AADSM.

SDDS founds the Certification Program which credentialed approximately  100 dentists between 1998 and 2004. I was credentialed by the SDDS under this program. In 1998 Dr Rosalind Cartwright recruited me to return to Rush Medical School Sleep Service as an Assistant Professor to treat patients at Rush, be involved in educational programs and make Dental Sleep Medicine an integral part of sleep medicine at Rush Medical School.

Rush Medical Sleep Disorder Service, under Dr Rosalind Cartwright was responsible for much of the earliest research into oral appliance therapy to treat sleep apnea and snoring.  The first articles came out of Rush on the Tongue Retaining Device form Dr Charles Samuelson who I worked closely with at the Medical School.  Dr Cartwright also published the first research on positional treatment of sleep apnea.

The SDDS officially became the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine in 2000 and became part of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine in 2002. In that year membership had grown from 20 doctors in 1991 to over 300 dentists. The following year the AADSM and AASM began to run their annual meetings together.

The American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine (ABDSM) replaces the ADSM’s Certification Program for the administration of board-certification in dental sleep medicine. I was among the first  group of official Diplomates, of The American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine under this program.

In 2006 the world of Dental Sleep Medicine changes drastically after the AASM publishes “Practice Parameters for the Treatment of Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Oral Appliances” in the journal SLEEP.

In 2006, the era of pioneers in Dental Sleep Medicine morphed into the era of active growth of the field of Dental Sleep Medicine. The Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine officially became the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine in 2006. In 2013 the membership of the AADSM surpassed 3000 active members.

In 2013 Cranio Journal officially changed it’s name form the “Journal of Craniomandibular Practice” to the “Journal of CranioMandibular and Sleep Practice” and I was asked due to my history in the fields of Sleep and TMJ by Riley Lunn the editor to write a Guest Editorial celebrating this change.    The editorial “TMJ Alas, The Great Imposter, has a Co-Conspirator: Poor Sleep”

Cranio. 2007 Apr;25(2):77-8.…

What is Sleep Apnea? Does Your Loved One Snore, Stop Breathing and Gasp for Breath?

Dr. Shapira Trouble breathing while asleep 0 Comments

Trouble breathing while asleep? It could be sleep apnea

what-is-sleep-apneaSnoring is the most common warning sign of sleep apnea.

Do you find it difficult to breathe when you sleep or find yourself snoring far too often? You could be suffering from something called sleep apnea.  Many patients are

Many patients are unaware of their sleep apnea, even when it is very severe or life-threatening and concerned family or friends inform them of the problems.  If you have loud disruptive snoring there is an excellent chance it is a warning sign.  Listen to the warning before it’s too late!

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder which occurs when breathing stops and starts repeatedly. You could have sleep apnea if you know you snore loudly and you still feel tired right through the day even if you thought you had enough sleep. Sleep apnea can happen when your throat muscles relax at the wrong time or when your brain fails to send the correct signals to the muscles that are responsible for controlling breathing.

These are some of the common sleep apnea symptoms:

  • Sleepy all day
  • Loud snoring
  • Short lapses in breathing while asleep
  • Sleep a lot but still tired
  • Suddenly waking up accompanied by a shortness of breath or heart palpitations
  • High Blood Pressure or Hypertension
  • Waking up with a dry mouth or a sore throat
  • Headache, especially morning headache
  • Insomnia, waking during the night and not being able to return to sleep.
  • Concentration problems
  • Motor Vehicle Accidents or near misses
  • Marital Discord

What  are some of the most common sleep apnea causes?

Apnea comes from the Greek meaning “want of breath”

The most common type of sleep apnea is called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This is when the muscles in the back of your throat relax and block your air flow.  This is actually an active process, when we breathe in we create a vacuum that sucks our airway shut, usually at the base of the tongue.When this happens, not enough oxygen gets into your blood. Your body reacts very quickly and you normally find yourself waking up suddenly with a choking or snorting noise. It tends to happen time and again through the night, so you just can’t get enough sleep.

Sleep Apnea is the most severe form of sleep disordered breathing and is a total blockage of the airway.  Hypopnea is an incomplete blockage of the airway that still causes oxygen to drop significantly but may just have snoring with total stoppage of breathing.  Upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS), also called Respiratory Related Arousals (RERA) is a partial blockage of the airway and is usually found in younger healthier and thinner individuals, especially women.  It can cause all the same symptoms as Sleep Apnea and is one of the major cause of  Fibromyalgia.

People with certain characteristics are more likely to experience sleep apnea. For instance, if you are overweight, a male or a smoker you are more likely to get sleep apnea. There are other physical reasons for sleep apnea, too. You might be more likely to get sleep apnea if you have a thick neck, a receding chin or enlarged adenoids or tonsils. Some allergies can cause sleep apnea too.  Many of the patients do not fit this clinical picture but still experience sleep apnea.  This is due to the configuration of their upper and lower jaws and tongue.

The problem could be dental related

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the NIH published a report on “The cardiovascular and sleep related consequences of Temporomandibular Disorders”. They have recognized that the same underlying mechanisms are involved in snoring, sleep apnea and TMJ disorders.

There are ways to relieve sleep apnea and it may be surprising to learn that dental solutions could help. You don’t have to suffer needlessly as these days there are devices available which have been shown to be very beneficial for sleep apnea sufferers.

Some of the most commonly used devices used by dentists look a bit like a sports mouth guard. They gently and comfortably move the lower jaw forwards and downwards and help to keep your airways open.  These are called Mandibular Advancement Devices (MAD) and there are over 100 types available.

One of these devices is the TAP 1 appliance that is one  the most effective devices available.  It consists of an upper and lower appliance connected with a hook and a bar.  There is a handle that is turned to advance the lower jaw.  This handle acts as a volume control for your bed partner.  who can turn off your snoring and increase your airway. The Somnodent appliance by Somnomed is one of the most comfortable appliances available.

A second device that may be used is a tongue retainer. This is a splint which holds the tongue in the right position and works to ensure the airway is kept open. Overall, dental solutions not only improve oral and dental health for sleep apnea sufferers, but improve sleep patterns and reduce snoring, too.

Could your medical solution be a Dental Appliance right for you?  Start living a better life now.

If you think you suffer from sleep apnea and have tried ways of relieving it without much success, then it may be time to consider a dental solution to this dangerous medical problem.

We will need to examine your mouth and throat properly and may be able to give useful recommendations about what can be done to help you relieve your symptoms.  Oral appliances are a first line treatment for mild to moderate sleep apnea.  CPAP is still considered the first choice for severe sleep apnea but oral appliances are considered an alternative to CPAP for patients desiring a more comfortable treatment or for patients who cannot tolerate CPAP.

Sleep disorders are often associated with other TMJ and orofacial pain disorders. Differential diagnosis of sleep and orofacial pain disorders is essential to health.…

Sleep Disorder Diagnosis

Dr. Shapira Sleep Disorder, Sleep Disorder Diagnosis 0 Comments

Do You Have a Sleep Disorder?

sleep-disorder-diagnosisIf you’re someone who has trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, sleeping too little or even sleeping too much, then it’s possible that you may have a sleeping disorder.

It’s important that you get the right amount of sleep so that you’re able to function properly the next day. If you don’t, it can easily need to various sleep loss symptoms, including fatigue, a lack of concentration and even relationship problems. Seeking treatment will allow you to start getting a good night’s rest that your body needs.

Because there are many various types of sleep disorders it’s important to see a sleep specialist who can offer a proper sleep disorder diagnosis. Two of the more common sleep disorders are sleep apnea and snoring. People who are experiencing these particular sleep disorders usually don’t receive the right amount of sleep their bodies need because they’re constantly being woken up.

In order for you to receive a proper diagnosis for why you’re not sleeping well, you’ll need to see a physician who can not only diagnose your sleeping disorder that can also help determine what the best method of treatment is going to be.

Who Can Diagnose Sleep Disorders?

Although dentists are not able to diagnose sleep problems, they can work closely with doctors, or even a sleep specialist in order to diagnose a sleeping problem. Because sleep apnea and snoring are very common when it comes to sleeping disorders and are directly related to the mouth area seeing a dentist for treatment is highly recommended.

There’s a close relationship between dentistry and sleep problems many dentists have the ability to use special appliances and even specialize surgical techniques that can help treat and correct a variety of sleep-related breathing disorders.

Let’s Study Your Sleep

In order to properly diagnose a sleep disorder there are a number of sleep home studies and labs that are specifically set up for this reason. Sleep images, which measure the patient’s quality of sleep, are also use and can be very helpful when it comes to receiving a proper diagnosis.

If a breathing-related sleep problem is indeed found, seeing a dentist for possible dental treatment options is a great place to start. One of the more popular treatments include using an orthotic, which is a device that helps to keep your airway open when sleeping. Another option includes full mouth reconstruction, which involves transforming your teeth and/or mouth in order to correct your bite and correct any breathing problems.

Learn More

If you’re interested in learning more about how you can receive a sleep disorder diagnosis by working together with both a physician and a dentist, be sure to contact us today so we can help you find the treatment that’s going to work best for you.